Author: matthewhong

Arghaël Untitled (2016) 2

Arghaël
Untitled (2016)
Charcoal and oil pastel
34,5 x 46 cm
900 euros
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Image: Arghaël

ARGHAËL

Through his work in filming portraits and commercials, Arghaël became fascinated by the human body, captured through the prism of camera eyes and editing rooms. Looking for a more personal mode of expression, he turned to charcoal and canvas to explore the rawness of human intimacy.

To hone his skills, he studied charcoal drawing with live models at the Ateliers Beaux-Arts of Paris (Gérard Venturelli’s class). From then on, Arghaël’s work will question the mystery of the flesh, frontally probing the unconscious (with every hand’s stroke) to ultimately give birth on canvas. What the artist calls « un incident pictural», a pictural incident.

In his exploration of the human body, Arghaël will soon bare it all, viscerally exposing the body within.

His charcoal now captures flesh, bones and blood vessels to their bare essence as he draws his men and women on the walls of his ‘mental cave’, the canvas lying before his eyes like a second skin.

At times, his carbon giants with oversized limbs and evanescent faces seem to be floating in space, reflecting newfound freedom in the very act of drawing.
Arghaël’s creatures rise to life before our eyes, true metaphors for the creative process. His graphic approach, similar to compositing, allows telluric flashes, amplified by warm pastels and oil painting. To capture flesh in its primitive expression, and give intemporal elegance to his bigger-than-life creations, Arghaël uses charcoal.

Encouraged by art-directors and curators he met in Berlin and Los Angeles galleries, Arghaël decides to show his work in Paris. In 2016, the Loo & Lou Gallery welcomes his first solo exhibition.

Arghaël Untitled (2016) 3

Arghaël
Untitled (2016)
Charcoal and oil pastel
34,5 x 46 cm
900 euros
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Image: Arghaël

ARGHAËL

Through his work in filming portraits and commercials, Arghaël became fascinated by the human body, captured through the prism of camera eyes and editing rooms. Looking for a more personal mode of expression, he turned to charcoal and canvas to explore the rawness of human intimacy.

To hone his skills, he studied charcoal drawing with live models at the Ateliers Beaux-Arts of Paris (Gérard Venturelli’s class). From then on, Arghaël’s work will question the mystery of the flesh, frontally probing the unconscious (with every hand’s stroke) to ultimately give birth on canvas. What the artist calls « un incident pictural», a pictural incident.

In his exploration of the human body, Arghaël will soon bare it all, viscerally exposing the body within.

His charcoal now captures flesh, bones and blood vessels to their bare essence as he draws his men and women on the walls of his ‘mental cave’, the canvas lying before his eyes like a second skin.

At times, his carbon giants with oversized limbs and evanescent faces seem to be floating in space, reflecting newfound freedom in the very act of drawing.
Arghaël’s creatures rise to life before our eyes, true metaphors for the creative process. His graphic approach, similar to compositing, allows telluric flashes, amplified by warm pastels and oil painting. To capture flesh in its primitive expression, and give intemporal elegance to his bigger-than-life creations, Arghaël uses charcoal.

Encouraged by art-directors and curators he met in Berlin and Los Angeles galleries, Arghaël decides to show his work in Paris. In 2016, the Loo & Lou Gallery welcomes his first solo exhibition.

Arghaël Untitled (2016) 4

Arghaël
Untitled (2016)
Charcoal and oil pastel
34,5 x 46 cm
900 euros
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ABOUT THE ARTIST

Image: Arghaël

ARGHAËL

Through his work in filming portraits and commercials, Arghaël became fascinated by the human body, captured through the prism of camera eyes and editing rooms. Looking for a more personal mode of expression, he turned to charcoal and canvas to explore the rawness of human intimacy.

To hone his skills, he studied charcoal drawing with live models at the Ateliers Beaux-Arts of Paris (Gérard Venturelli’s class). From then on, Arghaël’s work will question the mystery of the flesh, frontally probing the unconscious (with every hand’s stroke) to ultimately give birth on canvas. What the artist calls « un incident pictural», a pictural incident.

In his exploration of the human body, Arghaël will soon bare it all, viscerally exposing the body within.

His charcoal now captures flesh, bones and blood vessels to their bare essence as he draws his men and women on the walls of his ‘mental cave’, the canvas lying before his eyes like a second skin.

At times, his carbon giants with oversized limbs and evanescent faces seem to be floating in space, reflecting newfound freedom in the very act of drawing.
Arghaël’s creatures rise to life before our eyes, true metaphors for the creative process. His graphic approach, similar to compositing, allows telluric flashes, amplified by warm pastels and oil painting. To capture flesh in its primitive expression, and give intemporal elegance to his bigger-than-life creations, Arghaël uses charcoal.

Encouraged by art-directors and curators he met in Berlin and Los Angeles galleries, Arghaël decides to show his work in Paris. In 2016, the Loo & Lou Gallery welcomes his first solo exhibition.

Flo Arnold Carretera 1 (2020)

Flo Arnold
Carretera 1 (2020)
Celluosic fiber and mixed media
30 x 36 cm
880 euros
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FLO ARNOLD

Born in 1975 in Alsace (France), Flo Arnold grew up in Casablanca (Morocco). Graduated from the Académie des Arceaux (Montpellier, France), she continued her studies in the United States, where she became a member of The American Watercolor Society. She currently lives and works between Morocco and France.

The blending of cultures is a key element in her work. She has continued to explore this idea through many trips abroad, which include Africa, Europe, and the United States. Her artistic gestures are the result of her path, and her installations display this existential nomadism. Her creations are often backlit and sometimes supplemented with sound. She uses Japanese white paper to suggest ephemerality and fragility, a material that gives her sculptures a levitating effect.

Arnold’s sculptures thus float, creating a space for contemplation, spirituality, and self-reflection. As a citizen of the world, she “feeds” her sculptures through her encounters.

In April 2018, she created at the Atelier of the Loo & Lou Gallery the in-situ installation Vertige du monde. This germination of organic flows in paper, backlit and sounded, came to devour the space like a luxuriant vegetation. The architecture of the place disappeared under an immaculate waterfall. The visual artist underlined that in order for everyone to forget the vertigo of the world around us must live in a sphere without borders, without limits in search of inner peace. This proposal is complemented and nourished by the exhibition Territoire Unique by the artist Christophe Miralles, presented in parallel in the exhibition space of the Loo & Lou Gallery Haut Marais.

Florence Arnold has had various individual and group exhibitions in France and abroad as well as exhibited her work in numerous art fairs. She participated twice (in 2014 and in 2016) in the Marrakech Biennale. In the latter’s last edition, she exhibited for the first time one of her installations of water-repellent paper on sheathed brass. Following her participation in the art fair JustMad (Madrid, Spain) in 2019, she received the first prize of the Room Mate Collection. She also participated in Art Paris in 2019 with the Loo & Lou Gallery and in 2020 with the Bogéna Gallery (Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France).

Her work can be found in many private and public collections internationally, including the Mamda Foundation in Rabat, the Saadi Palace’s fonds in Marrakech, the BMCE Bank in Morocco, the San Francisco Food Bank, the Royal Palace of Morocco and the Palmeraie Museum in Marrakech.

Flo Arnold Carretera 3 (2020)

Flo Arnold
Carretera 3 (2020)
Celluosic fiber and mixed media
30 x 36 cm
880 euros
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FLO ARNOLD

Born in 1975 in Alsace (France), Flo Arnold grew up in Casablanca (Morocco). Graduated from the Académie des Arceaux (Montpellier, France), she continued her studies in the United States, where she became a member of The American Watercolor Society. She currently lives and works between Morocco and France.

The blending of cultures is a key element in her work. She has continued to explore this idea through many trips abroad, which include Africa, Europe, and the United States. Her artistic gestures are the result of her path, and her installations display this existential nomadism. Her creations are often backlit and sometimes supplemented with sound. She uses Japanese white paper to suggest ephemerality and fragility, a material that gives her sculptures a levitating effect.

Arnold’s sculptures thus float, creating a space for contemplation, spirituality, and self-reflection. As a citizen of the world, she “feeds” her sculptures through her encounters.

In April 2018, she created at the Atelier of the Loo & Lou Gallery the in-situ installation Vertige du monde. This germination of organic flows in paper, backlit and sounded, came to devour the space like a luxuriant vegetation. The architecture of the place disappeared under an immaculate waterfall. The visual artist underlined that in order for everyone to forget the vertigo of the world around us must live in a sphere without borders, without limits in search of inner peace. This proposal is complemented and nourished by the exhibition Territoire Unique by the artist Christophe Miralles, presented in parallel in the exhibition space of the Loo & Lou Gallery Haut Marais.

Florence Arnold has had various individual and group exhibitions in France and abroad as well as exhibited her work in numerous art fairs. She participated twice (in 2014 and in 2016) in the Marrakech Biennale. In the latter’s last edition, she exhibited for the first time one of her installations of water-repellent paper on sheathed brass. Following her participation in the art fair JustMad (Madrid, Spain) in 2019, she received the first prize of the Room Mate Collection. She also participated in Art Paris in 2019 with the Loo & Lou Gallery and in 2020 with the Bogéna Gallery (Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France).

Her work can be found in many private and public collections internationally, including the Mamda Foundation in Rabat, the Saadi Palace’s fonds in Marrakech, the BMCE Bank in Morocco, the San Francisco Food Bank, the Royal Palace of Morocco and the Palmeraie Museum in Marrakech.

Tana Borissova Corps vague noir 07 (2019)

Tana Borissova
Corps vague noir 07 (2019)
Ink
29,5 x 40,5 cm
900 euros
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TANA BORISSOVA

Tana Borissova was born in Sofia, Bulgaria in 1978. She has been living and working in Paris, France since 1997.

She became interested in art through books that she discovered during her childhood. While studying in a high school of applied arts in Sofia, her desire to create art was awoken when she began creating oil paintings, watercolors, and drawings. When she arrived in Paris at the age of nineteen, she was accepted to the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-arts (ENSBA), where she studied with Vladimir Velickovic and Dominique Gauthier. She graduated in 2003.

In her work, Borissova explores the body, the space within it, and its interactions with the outside world. She does so by referencing nature and its metamorphoses, movements, momentum, and contradictions that go beyond a scale of time.

The gallery Myriam Bouagal exhibited her first solo show, Corps, in January 2014, as well as her second show in June 2015, Ma place mon corps, which included inks and paintings. In September 2017, she presented her work in the Arrivage Gallery in Troyes. She published a collection of inks and texts for the occasion. In May 2019, she presented a selection of her inks and paintings with Loo & Lou Gallery during the JustLX art fair in Lisbon, Portugal at the Museu da Carris. From January to March 2020, the Loo & Lou Atelier hosted an exhibition of her paintings entitled Éclats de nuit.

Tana Borissova Corps Vague 13 (2019)

Tana Borissova
Corps Vague 13 (2019)
Ink
24 x 32 cm
900 euros
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TANA BORISSOVA

Tana Borissova was born in Sofia, Bulgaria in 1978. She has been living and working in Paris, France since 1997.

She became interested in art through books that she discovered during her childhood. While studying in a high school of applied arts in Sofia, her desire to create art was awoken when she began creating oil paintings, watercolors, and drawings. When she arrived in Paris at the age of nineteen, she was accepted to the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-arts (ENSBA), where she studied with Vladimir Velickovic and Dominique Gauthier. She graduated in 2003.

In her work, Borissova explores the body, the space within it, and its interactions with the outside world. She does so by referencing nature and its metamorphoses, movements, momentum, and contradictions that go beyond a scale of time.

The gallery Myriam Bouagal exhibited her first solo show, Corps, in January 2014, as well as her second show in June 2015, Ma place mon corps, which included inks and paintings. In September 2017, she presented her work in the Arrivage Gallery in Troyes. She published a collection of inks and texts for the occasion. In May 2019, she presented a selection of her inks and paintings with Loo & Lou Gallery during the JustLX art fair in Lisbon, Portugal at the Museu da Carris. From January to March 2020, the Loo & Lou Atelier hosted an exhibition of her paintings entitled Éclats de nuit.

Elisabeth Daynès Blister (2018)

Elisabeth Daynès
Blister (2018)
Silicon, plexi, metal
18 x 11 x 3 cm
990 euros
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Photo Delphine Crépin

ELISABETH DAYNÈS

Elisabeth Daynès was born in Beziers, France in 1960 and currently lives and works in Paris.

In the early stages of her career in theater, she was fascinated by questions of identity and metamorphosis. In the 1990s, this passion led her to painstakingly recreate the bodies of prehistoric hominids based on advanced scientific knowledge. Soon after, she became a world-renowned paleo artist, notably with her reconstructions of fossil hominids for the Museum of Tautavel or her recreation of the Australopithecus Lucy in 1999 for the Field Museum in Chicago. In 2010, she was awarded the John J. Lanzendorf PaleoArt Prize. In 2011, the Ile-de-France Museum of Prehistory devoted a solo exhibition to her work while a number of her sculptures of hominids were inaugurated in South Korea.

After creating work based on the origins of humanity, Daynès now invites the public to reflect on the trials of appearance and the human face, both today and in the future. As she plays with and recomposes the human skull, by varying its size, material, and treatment, she shows us all the faces that we might have had and that we will have one day, if we so choose.

She wishes to show that in a time of social networking and ubiquitous images, we are free to invent endless narcissistic mirrors wherein boundaries blur between real and virtual, natural and artificial. Physical appearance and the perpetual search for perfection today has become an obsession. Changing your nose or lips for a professional meeting or for dinner with friends is not as surreal of a thought at a time when technology has taken the relay of biological evolution.

Her work demonstrates that in the future as well as in the past, we are not the apex of evolution, nor are we the only possible humanity. We have always been diverse, and we will only become increasingly more so. Her art constantly plays with science as it feeds much of our imagination, with the two taking the viewer on a voyage through time.

Elisabeth Daynès Breast pépinières roses (2020)

Elisabeth Daynès
Breast pépinières roses (2020)
16 mushrooms (two works displayed) / Marble plaster, metal, slate
31 x 20 x 16 cm
1 540 euros each
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Photo Delphine Crépin

ELISABETH DAYNÈS

Elisabeth Daynès was born in Beziers, France in 1960 and currently lives and works in Paris.

In the early stages of her career in theater, she was fascinated by questions of identity and metamorphosis. In the 1990s, this passion led her to painstakingly recreate the bodies of prehistoric hominids based on advanced scientific knowledge. Soon after, she became a world-renowned paleo artist, notably with her reconstructions of fossil hominids for the Museum of Tautavel or her recreation of the Australopithecus Lucy in 1999 for the Field Museum in Chicago. In 2010, she was awarded the John J. Lanzendorf PaleoArt Prize. In 2011, the Ile-de-France Museum of Prehistory devoted a solo exhibition to her work while a number of her sculptures of hominids were inaugurated in South Korea.

After creating work based on the origins of humanity, Daynès now invites the public to reflect on the trials of appearance and the human face, both today and in the future. As she plays with and recomposes the human skull, by varying its size, material, and treatment, she shows us all the faces that we might have had and that we will have one day, if we so choose.

She wishes to show that in a time of social networking and ubiquitous images, we are free to invent endless narcissistic mirrors wherein boundaries blur between real and virtual, natural and artificial. Physical appearance and the perpetual search for perfection today has become an obsession. Changing your nose or lips for a professional meeting or for dinner with friends is not as surreal of a thought at a time when technology has taken the relay of biological evolution.

Her work demonstrates that in the future as well as in the past, we are not the apex of evolution, nor are we the only possible humanity. We have always been diverse, and we will only become increasingly more so. Her art constantly plays with science as it feeds much of our imagination, with the two taking the viewer on a voyage through time.

Elisabeth Daynès Breast pépinière marron (2020)

Elisabeth Daynès
Breast pépinière marron (2020)
7 mushrooms / Marble plaster, metal, slate
20 x 10 x 16 cm
990 euros
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Photo Delphine Crépin

ELISABETH DAYNÈS

Elisabeth Daynès was born in Beziers, France in 1960 and currently lives and works in Paris.

In the early stages of her career in theater, she was fascinated by questions of identity and metamorphosis. In the 1990s, this passion led her to painstakingly recreate the bodies of prehistoric hominids based on advanced scientific knowledge. Soon after, she became a world-renowned paleo artist, notably with her reconstructions of fossil hominids for the Museum of Tautavel or her recreation of the Australopithecus Lucy in 1999 for the Field Museum in Chicago. In 2010, she was awarded the John J. Lanzendorf PaleoArt Prize. In 2011, the Ile-de-France Museum of Prehistory devoted a solo exhibition to her work while a number of her sculptures of hominids were inaugurated in South Korea.

After creating work based on the origins of humanity, Daynès now invites the public to reflect on the trials of appearance and the human face, both today and in the future. As she plays with and recomposes the human skull, by varying its size, material, and treatment, she shows us all the faces that we might have had and that we will have one day, if we so choose.

She wishes to show that in a time of social networking and ubiquitous images, we are free to invent endless narcissistic mirrors wherein boundaries blur between real and virtual, natural and artificial. Physical appearance and the perpetual search for perfection today has become an obsession. Changing your nose or lips for a professional meeting or for dinner with friends is not as surreal of a thought at a time when technology has taken the relay of biological evolution.

Her work demonstrates that in the future as well as in the past, we are not the apex of evolution, nor are we the only possible humanity. We have always been diverse, and we will only become increasingly more so. Her art constantly plays with science as it feeds much of our imagination, with the two taking the viewer on a voyage through time.

Elisabeth Daynès Breast pépinière rose (2020)

Elisabeth Daynès
Breast pépinières roses (2020)
7 mushrooms / Marble plaster, metal, slate
20 x 10 x 16 cm
990 euros
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Photo Delphine Crépin

ELISABETH DAYNÈS

Elisabeth Daynès was born in Beziers, France in 1960 and currently lives and works in Paris.

In the early stages of her career in theater, she was fascinated by questions of identity and metamorphosis. In the 1990s, this passion led her to painstakingly recreate the bodies of prehistoric hominids based on advanced scientific knowledge. Soon after, she became a world-renowned paleo artist, notably with her reconstructions of fossil hominids for the Museum of Tautavel or her recreation of the Australopithecus Lucy in 1999 for the Field Museum in Chicago. In 2010, she was awarded the John J. Lanzendorf PaleoArt Prize. In 2011, the Ile-de-France Museum of Prehistory devoted a solo exhibition to her work while a number of her sculptures of hominids were inaugurated in South Korea.

After creating work based on the origins of humanity, Daynès now invites the public to reflect on the trials of appearance and the human face, both today and in the future. As she plays with and recomposes the human skull, by varying its size, material, and treatment, she shows us all the faces that we might have had and that we will have one day, if we so choose.

She wishes to show that in a time of social networking and ubiquitous images, we are free to invent endless narcissistic mirrors wherein boundaries blur between real and virtual, natural and artificial. Physical appearance and the perpetual search for perfection today has become an obsession. Changing your nose or lips for a professional meeting or for dinner with friends is not as surreal of a thought at a time when technology has taken the relay of biological evolution.

Her work demonstrates that in the future as well as in the past, we are not the apex of evolution, nor are we the only possible humanity. We have always been diverse, and we will only become increasingly more so. Her art constantly plays with science as it feeds much of our imagination, with the two taking the viewer on a voyage through time.

Elisabeth Daynès Léa (2016)

Elisabeth Daynès
Léa (2016)
Jesmonite, burnt wood base
12 x 26 x 10 cm
990 euros
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Photo Delphine Crépin

ELISABETH DAYNÈS

Elisabeth Daynès was born in Beziers, France in 1960 and currently lives and works in Paris.

In the early stages of her career in theater, she was fascinated by questions of identity and metamorphosis. In the 1990s, this passion led her to painstakingly recreate the bodies of prehistoric hominids based on advanced scientific knowledge. Soon after, she became a world-renowned paleo artist, notably with her reconstructions of fossil hominids for the Museum of Tautavel or her recreation of the Australopithecus Lucy in 1999 for the Field Museum in Chicago. In 2010, she was awarded the John J. Lanzendorf PaleoArt Prize. In 2011, the Ile-de-France Museum of Prehistory devoted a solo exhibition to her work while a number of her sculptures of hominids were inaugurated in South Korea.

After creating work based on the origins of humanity, Daynès now invites the public to reflect on the trials of appearance and the human face, both today and in the future. As she plays with and recomposes the human skull, by varying its size, material, and treatment, she shows us all the faces that we might have had and that we will have one day, if we so choose.

She wishes to show that in a time of social networking and ubiquitous images, we are free to invent endless narcissistic mirrors wherein boundaries blur between real and virtual, natural and artificial. Physical appearance and the perpetual search for perfection today has become an obsession. Changing your nose or lips for a professional meeting or for dinner with friends is not as surreal of a thought at a time when technology has taken the relay of biological evolution.

Her work demonstrates that in the future as well as in the past, we are not the apex of evolution, nor are we the only possible humanity. We have always been diverse, and we will only become increasingly more so. Her art constantly plays with science as it feeds much of our imagination, with the two taking the viewer on a voyage through time.

ARGHAËL

ARGHAËL

Arghaël became fascinated by the human body while working as a film director, capturing life through the prism of cameras and editing rooms. In searching for a more personal mode of expression, he turned to charcoal and canvas to explore raw human intimacy. He studied charcoal drawing with live models at the Beaux-Arts University in Paris to develop his skills. 

Arghaël’s work questions the mystery of the flesh, frontally probing the unconscious and ultimately giving birth on canvas with the stroke of his hand. His charcoal drawings capture flesh and bone in their bare essence. Drawing his men and women on the walls of what he calls his “mental cave,” or the canvas laying before his eyes like a second skin. 

At times, his oversized subjects and their evanescent faces seem to be floating in space, evoking a kind of newfound freedom. Arghaël’s creatures rise to life before us and become metaphors for his creative process. His graphic approach, similar to compositing, allows telluric flashes that are amplified by warm pastels and oil paints. Arghaël uses charcoal to capture flesh in a primitive expression and gives in-temporal elegance to his larger-than-life creations. In 2016, Loo & Lou Gallery exhibited his very first solo show.

  • Bird, Fusain, 50x65cm, 2013 ©Arghael
  • Nu penché, fusain, 50x65cm, 2014 ©Arghael
  • Maelstrom, fusain et acrylique, 115x130cm, 2015 ©Arghael
  • Loup, fusain, 50x65cm, 2013 ©Arghael
  • Sans titre, fusain et pastel à l’huile, 34,5 x 46cm, 2016 © Arghaël
  • Sans titre, fusain et pastel à l’huile, 77 x 106,5cm, 2016 © Arghaël
  • Sans titre, fusain et pastel à l’huile, 34,5 x 46cm, 2016 © Arghaël
  • Sans titre, fusain et pastel à l’huile, 106,5 x 76,5cm, 2016 © Arghaël
  • Sans titre, fusain et pastel à l’huile et peinture acrylique, 212 x 134cm, 2016 © Arghaël
  • Sans titre, fusain et pastel à l’huile, 167 x 108,5cm, 2016 © Arghaël

LYDIE ARICKX

Lydie Arickx

Lydie Arickx is a painter and a sculptor who was born in 1954 in France from Flemish parents.

After graduating in 1978 from the École Supérieure d’Arts Graphiques de Paris (ESAG), she had her first solo exhibition of pastels and oil paintings in 1979 at Jean Briance Gallery. Since the beginning of the 1980s, she has participated in international events such as Art Basel, FIAC, and Art Paris. In 1988, she presented her work in Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and the United States with a group exhibition at Amaury Taittinger in New York in which her work was presented alongside pieces by Francis Bacon. In 1991, she moved to Landes and worked on large forms and pursued the creation of monumental sculptures. In 1999, for the 800th anniversary of the Jurade of Saint Émilion, Arickx presented a double personal exhibition in the cloister of the Monolithic Church. Arickx regularly organizes cultural events in theaters, such as the Art Sénat 2001, which meshes contemporary art and live performance, while also hosting creative workshops for schools and businesses.

Arickx’s pieces have been incorporated into major international public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art in Paris, the Pompidou Center, Palais de Tokyo, Fonds National d’Art Contemporain, as well as in public spaces such as the Paul-Brousse Hospital, the Intercommunal Hospital Center of Créteil, the IUFM of Mont-de-Marsan, the MACS Saint-Vincent-de-Tyronne, and a fresco for the commemoration of the centenary of the arenas of Dax in 2013. Arickx’s studio is a source for experimentation, where she likes to share with all audiences. 

In 2014, she published her first book, Nous vivons, with Diabase editions. In May 2015, Arickx filled the city of Roubaix with four large exhibitions that paid homage to her family roots, one of which was at the Piscine, a museum for art and industry, with a monumental fresco that measured up to 200 meters long. The following year, filled with experience from Roubaix, Arickx was invited by the Center of National Monuments to create two monumental performances with one exhibition in the room for the Gens d’armes at the Conciergerie in Paris and one installation at the Expiatory Chapel. In 2017, for her first collaboration with Loo & Lou, she exposed her work during the exhibition “Gravité,” which took over the gallery’s three spaces. In 2018, she participated the exhibition, Tant qu’il y aura des Ogres, which included more than 500 works around the theme of the fairytale. Later, in 2019, she exhibited work alongside Niki de Saint Phalle and other female artists for  « Créatrices – L’émancipation par l’art », which was held in the Museum of Fine Arts in Rennes.

Her exhibition Arborescences was on view at the National Domain of Chambord, another architectural and historical gem, in 2021. Arickx used different themed rooms to transform the architecture of this historic monument with a transfigured vision of living beings. For more information, please click here.

  • Cabinet of curiosity, Exhibition “Arborescences” | Château de Chambord
  • L’évolution (Oscar), 2020, Bone and resin bas relief on emery cloth, 213 x 305 cm
  • Série Chemin de croix, 2020, Bones, 43 x 31 x 20 cm
  • Série Chemin de croix, 2020, Magnetic ferrite, 39 x 39 x 18 cm
  • Série Chemin de croix, 2020, Resin and bones, 30 x 17,5 x 11 cm
  • “Oeuf solaire” | Exposition “Arborescences” 2021 | Château de Chambord
  • Exhibition view “Toiles Vivantes” 2019 | Loo & Lou Gallery Haut-Marais
  • Exhibition view “Toiles vivantes” 2019 | Loo & Lou Gallery Haut Marais
  • View of Lydie Arickx’s performance in the Loo & Lou Atelier
  • View of Lydie Arickx’s performance in the Loo & Lou Atelier
  • Detail from Lydie Arickx’s performance in the Loo & Lou Atelier
  • View of Lydie Arickx’s performance in the Loo & Lou Atelier
  • Exhibition view “Gravité” 2017 | Loo & Lou Gallery Haut-Marais
  • Exhibition view “Gravité” 2017 | Loo & Lou Gallery Haut-Marais
  • Exhibition view “Gravité” 2017 | Loo & Lou Gallery George V
  • Exhibition view “Gravité” 2017 | Loo & Lou Gallery George V

Didier Genty Tête (2018)

Didier Genty
Tête (2018)
Acrylic
24 x 32 cm
440 euros
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Image: Whatever

DIDIER GENTY

Born in 1956, Didier Genty lives and works in the Paris region. He trained at the Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux.

“I like muscles, blood circulation, the underside of the skin… Identity is DNA, invisible, interior. My portraits are more related to the deep being of an individual, beyond appearances. In the face, I prefer his imprint. I thus avoid the complacency inherent to the practice of self-portraiture. My painting like this Folfiri, my chemotherapy, flows in the features of these bodies in jolts, slumped. From within things, flesh and moods swarm all over the surface and in thickness, the scratches of color, the waxy, brutal and uncompromising features. A big tiredness, a bad taste in the mouth, the body is undoubtedly diminished but the painting remains very alive, a question of survival”.

– Didier Genty

Didier Genty Tête (2018)

Didier Genty
Tête (2018)
Acrylic
24 x 32 cm
440 euros
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Image: Whatever

DIDIER GENTY

Born in 1956, Didier Genty lives and works in the Paris region. He trained at the Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux.

“I like muscles, blood circulation, the underside of the skin… Identity is DNA, invisible, interior. My portraits are more related to the deep being of an individual, beyond appearances. In the face, I prefer his imprint. I thus avoid the complacency inherent to the practice of self-portraiture. My painting like this Folfiri, my chemotherapy, flows in the features of these bodies in jolts, slumped. From within things, flesh and moods swarm all over the surface and in thickness, the scratches of color, the waxy, brutal and uncompromising features. A big tiredness, a bad taste in the mouth, the body is undoubtedly diminished but the painting remains very alive, a question of survival”.

– Didier Genty

Didier Genty Tête (2020)

Didier Genty
Tête (2020)
Acrylic
56 x 76 cm
990 euros
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DIDIER GENTY

Born in 1956, Didier Genty lives and works in the Paris region. He trained at the Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux.

“I like muscles, blood circulation, the underside of the skin… Identity is DNA, invisible, interior. My portraits are more related to the deep being of an individual, beyond appearances. In the face, I prefer his imprint. I thus avoid the complacency inherent to the practice of self-portraiture. My painting like this Folfiri, my chemotherapy, flows in the features of these bodies in jolts, slumped. From within things, flesh and moods swarm all over the surface and in thickness, the scratches of color, the waxy, brutal and uncompromising features. A big tiredness, a bad taste in the mouth, the body is undoubtedly diminished but the painting remains very alive, a question of survival”.

– Didier Genty

Cedric Le Corf Série Vanité (2013-2017)

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Cedric Le Corf
Série Vanité (2013-2017)
Oil on canvas
30 x 30 cm
880 euros each
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Cedric Le Corf Vanité 16 (2013)

Cedric Le Corf
Vanité 16 (2013)
Oil on canvas
30 x 30 cm
880 euros
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Cedric Le Corf Justa 4 (2018)

Cedric Le Corf
Justa 4 (2018)
Drypoint etching
76 x 106 cm / Limited Edition
880 euros
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Cedric Le Corf Mâchoires (2014)

Cedric Le Corf
Mâchoires (2014)
Drypoint etching
95 x 65 cm / Limited Edition
900 euros
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Cedric Le Corf Ossuaire (2019)

Cedric Le Corf
Ossuaire (2019)
Drypoint etching
Diameter 44 cm / Edition of 10
880 euros
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Cedric Le Corf Le vexin II, hommage à Corot (2018)

Cedric Le Corf
Le vexin II, hommage à Corot (2018)
Drypoint etching
70 x 84 cm / Edition of 20
660 euros
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Cedric Le Corf Le vexin III, hommage à Corot (2018)

Cedric Le Corf
Le vexin III, hommage à Corot (2018)
Drypoint etching
70 x 84 cm / Edition of 10
700 euros
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Cedric Le Corf La mare au diable II 2017

Cedric Le Corf
La mare au diable II 2017
Drypoint etching
50 x 40 cm / Edition of 10
800 euros
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Cedric Le Corf La mare au diable I 2017

Cedric Le Corf
La mare au diable I 2017
Drypoint etching
50 x 40 cm / Limited Edition
800 euros
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Cedric Le Corf Kermouzouet 1 (2018)

Cedric Le Corf
Kermouzouet 1 (2018)
Drypoint etching
60 x 50 cm / Edition of 20
660 euros
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Cedric Le Corf Kermouzouet 4 (2018)

Cedric Le Corf
Kermouzouet 4 (2018)
Drypoint etching
60 x 50 cm / Edition of 20
660 euros
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Cedric Le Corf Kermouzouet 5 (2018)

  • Cedric-Le-Corf-Kermouzouet-5-2018

  • Cedric-Le-Corf-Kermouzouet-5-2018b

Cedric Le Corf
Kermouzouet 5 (2018)
Drypoint etching
60 x 50 cm / Edition of 10
660 euros
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Image: Despatin & Gobell

CEDRIC LE CORF

Cedric Le Corf was born in 1985 in Bühl (Germany). He graduated with honors from the École Européenne Supérieure d’Art de Bretagne in Lorient (France) in 2009. Today, he lives and works in Brittany.

The subject of his work lends itself to anatomical landscapes inspired by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty’s boards, where little by little, a dismembered man is transformed into a landscape of a man. Humans, trees, and the earth all possess in common a kind “skin” and with it the ability to be flayed. Is it untrue to think that a dissected body is merely a wide range of landscapes, full of mishaps, folds, and crevices? The coarseness of bone is reminiscent to the rocky landscapes of Patinir; the venous, arterial, or nervous network irrigates like rivers, plains, and estuaries; the muscles, the clay of Genesis, model gorges and mounds.

Following this metaphor, he uses plant roots as a landscape element to interlock bones, vertebrae, or joints made of porcelain. The root, in its etymological sense, is one element implanted inside another, much like the root of a tooth, a hair, or the dorsal root of a spinal nerve. It therefore juxtaposes a raw element of chaos with the mastery of creation; from roughness to polish, from decomposition to the inalterable, from the durability of art to the ephemeral man. Imbued with the Rhineland and Armorican heritage, confronted with the pathos of Grünewald (Baldung Grien), the hanged men within “Des misères de la guerre” by Jacques Callot at “l’Ankou”, along with the macabre dances of Kernascléden where the animate and the inanimate are mixed, to the horror of the mass graves of Sobibor, Le Corf tries, by attaching himself to these motifs, to deafen the subject that his work contains.

Christophe Miralles Nuance (2021)

Christophe Miralles
Nuance (2021)
Oil and mixed technique on paper
64.5 x 80 cm
1200 euros
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CHRISTOPHE MIRALLES

Born in 1970, Christophe Miralles is a Franco-Spanish artist who lives and works between Burgundy and Casablanca.

His work is nourished by various sources that go back to its origins: from his Moroccan roots, one can note some Mediterranean influences coming from two shores, which resonate and never collide with each other. Spanish painting from the Golden Age undoubtedly sealed his relationship with light and compositions: we can see in his work the influence of figures such as Velázquez, Zurbarán or El Greco.

Human figures suspended in the void haunt his canvases inviting worrying feelings and a certain nostalgia. These are depersonalized figures, devoid of identity, which remind us of Francis Bacon’s characters. The combination of simplified forms and subtle nuances in colors allows him to give an intemporal aspect to his paintings, where the material is the main subject.
Miralles creates oil paintings on paper and canvas, and uses lacquers. He brought together a series for an exhibition at Loo & Lou Gallery entitled Territoire Unique in April 2018. His works spoke of humanity, travel, and tolerance. Colors burn through his canvases, engorging the space in flames wherein the ashes slowly fall on his large black papers. He is a painter anchored in contemporary society, a territory that he hopes is unique for all. This work was complemented and nourished by the exhibition Vertige du monde by the artist Flo Arnold, presented in collaboration at the Loo & Lou Gallery’s Atelier.

He has received several artistic prizes, such as the Grand Prix Claire Combes of the Taylor Foundation in 2007, the Prix Azart in 2005 or the Prix Charles Oulmont in 2004, which he received with honors from the jury. His work has been the subject of numerous monographic exhibitions in France and abroad and his work is included in several collections. He has also participated in several fairs, including JustMad (Madrid, Spain) with the gallery Loo & Lou in 2019, the Marrakech Biennale (Marrakech, Morocco) or Art Up (Lille, France) in 2016.

Christophe Miralles Juge 1 (2020)

Christophe Miralles
Juge 1 (2020)
Graphite and acrylic on paper
50 x 70 cm
SOLD
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CHRISTOPHE MIRALLES

Born in 1970, Christophe Miralles is a Franco-Spanish artist who lives and works between Burgundy and Casablanca.

His work is nourished by various sources that go back to its origins: from his Moroccan roots, one can note some Mediterranean influences coming from two shores, which resonate and never collide with each other. Spanish painting from the Golden Age undoubtedly sealed his relationship with light and compositions: we can see in his work the influence of figures such as Velázquez, Zurbarán or El Greco.

Human figures suspended in the void haunt his canvases inviting worrying feelings and a certain nostalgia. These are depersonalized figures, devoid of identity, which remind us of Francis Bacon’s characters. The combination of simplified forms and subtle nuances in colors allows him to give an intemporal aspect to his paintings, where the material is the main subject.
Miralles creates oil paintings on paper and canvas, and uses lacquers. He brought together a series for an exhibition at Loo & Lou Gallery entitled Territoire Unique in April 2018. His works spoke of humanity, travel, and tolerance. Colors burn through his canvases, engorging the space in flames wherein the ashes slowly fall on his large black papers. He is a painter anchored in contemporary society, a territory that he hopes is unique for all. This work was complemented and nourished by the exhibition Vertige du monde by the artist Flo Arnold, presented in collaboration at the Loo & Lou Gallery’s Atelier.

He has received several artistic prizes, such as the Grand Prix Claire Combes of the Taylor Foundation in 2007, the Prix Azart in 2005 or the Prix Charles Oulmont in 2004, which he received with honors from the jury. His work has been the subject of numerous monographic exhibitions in France and abroad and his work is included in several collections. He has also participated in several fairs, including JustMad (Madrid, Spain) with the gallery Loo & Lou in 2019, the Marrakech Biennale (Marrakech, Morocco) or Art Up (Lille, France) in 2016.

Christophe Miralles Juge 2 (2020)

Christophe Miralles
Juge 2 (2020)
Graphite and acrylic on paper
50 x 70 cm
800 euros
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ABOUT THE ARTIST

CHRISTOPHE MIRALLES

Born in 1970, Christophe Miralles is a Franco-Spanish artist who lives and works between Burgundy and Casablanca.

His work is nourished by various sources that go back to its origins: from his Moroccan roots, one can note some Mediterranean influences coming from two shores, which resonate and never collide with each other. Spanish painting from the Golden Age undoubtedly sealed his relationship with light and compositions: we can see in his work the influence of figures such as Velázquez, Zurbarán or El Greco.

Human figures suspended in the void haunt his canvases inviting worrying feelings and a certain nostalgia. These are depersonalized figures, devoid of identity, which remind us of Francis Bacon’s characters. The combination of simplified forms and subtle nuances in colors allows him to give an intemporal aspect to his paintings, where the material is the main subject.
Miralles creates oil paintings on paper and canvas, and uses lacquers. He brought together a series for an exhibition at Loo & Lou Gallery entitled Territoire Unique in April 2018. His works spoke of humanity, travel, and tolerance. Colors burn through his canvases, engorging the space in flames wherein the ashes slowly fall on his large black papers. He is a painter anchored in contemporary society, a territory that he hopes is unique for all. This work was complemented and nourished by the exhibition Vertige du monde by the artist Flo Arnold, presented in collaboration at the Loo & Lou Gallery’s Atelier.

He has received several artistic prizes, such as the Grand Prix Claire Combes of the Taylor Foundation in 2007, the Prix Azart in 2005 or the Prix Charles Oulmont in 2004, which he received with honors from the jury. His work has been the subject of numerous monographic exhibitions in France and abroad and his work is included in several collections. He has also participated in several fairs, including JustMad (Madrid, Spain) with the gallery Loo & Lou in 2019, the Marrakech Biennale (Marrakech, Morocco) or Art Up (Lille, France) in 2016.

Christophe Miralles Grisaille (2019)

Christophe Miralles
Grisaille (2019)
Acrylic and glycero paint on paper
65 x 55 cm
900 euros
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ABOUT THE ARTIST

CHRISTOPHE MIRALLES

Born in 1970, Christophe Miralles is a Franco-Spanish artist who lives and works between Burgundy and Casablanca.

His work is nourished by various sources that go back to its origins: from his Moroccan roots, one can note some Mediterranean influences coming from two shores, which resonate and never collide with each other. Spanish painting from the Golden Age undoubtedly sealed his relationship with light and compositions: we can see in his work the influence of figures such as Velázquez, Zurbarán or El Greco.

Human figures suspended in the void haunt his canvases inviting worrying feelings and a certain nostalgia. These are depersonalized figures, devoid of identity, which remind us of Francis Bacon’s characters. The combination of simplified forms and subtle nuances in colors allows him to give an intemporal aspect to his paintings, where the material is the main subject.
Miralles creates oil paintings on paper and canvas, and uses lacquers. He brought together a series for an exhibition at Loo & Lou Gallery entitled Territoire Unique in April 2018. His works spoke of humanity, travel, and tolerance. Colors burn through his canvases, engorging the space in flames wherein the ashes slowly fall on his large black papers. He is a painter anchored in contemporary society, a territory that he hopes is unique for all. This work was complemented and nourished by the exhibition Vertige du monde by the artist Flo Arnold, presented in collaboration at the Loo & Lou Gallery’s Atelier.

He has received several artistic prizes, such as the Grand Prix Claire Combes of the Taylor Foundation in 2007, the Prix Azart in 2005 or the Prix Charles Oulmont in 2004, which he received with honors from the jury. His work has been the subject of numerous monographic exhibitions in France and abroad and his work is included in several collections. He has also participated in several fairs, including JustMad (Madrid, Spain) with the gallery Loo & Lou in 2019, the Marrakech Biennale (Marrakech, Morocco) or Art Up (Lille, France) in 2016.

Catherine Wilkening Petite Croix IV (2021)

Catherine Wilkening
Petite Croix IV (2021)
Enameled porcelain
16,5 x 12 cm
SOLD
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CATHERINE WILKENING

“One day in 2002, during my career as an actress, the need to put my hands in matter imposed itself on me; the earth became vital to me at once. I launched into sculpture with a primal, animal instinct, guided by a deep and irreproachable impulse. My exploration is underground and organic, my work is physical, sensual, enjoyable. There is no conceptual plan, I let go of what is in my head and become one with living matter. I take a leap into the void.

My work has always been nourished by the feminine figure, with obsessive themes – birth, chaos, death, rebirth, impermanence, devotion, cannibalism – subjects that I explored through porcelain sculptures in 2019 during Art Paris at the Grand Palais with Loo & Lou Gallery. Today, going through these long periods of confinement in an anxiety-provoking climate, I feel the need to connect to the luminous, the spiritual, the elevated, the transcendental… to work on repetition, the multiple, the swarming, the infinite, the infinitely monumental in the infinitely tiny, like mantras that soothe and numb cerebral agitation, like broad breaths – to build from chaos, from fragments of aborted or abandoned sculptures, and give them a new breath of life… These long months of gestation birthed immense, immaculate, porcelain Madonnas, adorned with gold, Murano glass, crowned with roses, thorns, roots.”

– Catherine Wilkening

Catherine Wilkening Petite Croix V (2021)

Catherine Wilkening
Petite Croix V (2021)
Enameled porcelain
16,5 x 11,5 cm
550 euros
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RELATED WORKS
ABOUT THE ARTIST

CATHERINE WILKENING

“One day in 2002, during my career as an actress, the need to put my hands in matter imposed itself on me; the earth became vital to me at once. I launched into sculpture with a primal, animal instinct, guided by a deep and irreproachable impulse. My exploration is underground and organic, my work is physical, sensual, enjoyable. There is no conceptual plan, I let go of what is in my head and become one with living matter. I take a leap into the void.

My work has always been nourished by the feminine figure, with obsessive themes – birth, chaos, death, rebirth, impermanence, devotion, cannibalism – subjects that I explored through porcelain sculptures in 2019 during Art Paris at the Grand Palais with Loo & Lou Gallery. Today, going through these long periods of confinement in an anxiety-provoking climate, I feel the need to connect to the luminous, the spiritual, the elevated, the transcendental… to work on repetition, the multiple, the swarming, the infinite, the infinitely monumental in the infinitely tiny, like mantras that soothe and numb cerebral agitation, like broad breaths – to build from chaos, from fragments of aborted or abandoned sculptures, and give them a new breath of life… These long months of gestation birthed immense, immaculate, porcelain Madonnas, adorned with gold, Murano glass, crowned with roses, thorns, roots.”

– Catherine Wilkening

Catherine Wilkening Petite Croix VI (2021)

Catherine Wilkening
Petite Croix VI (2021)
Enameled porcelain
19 x 14 cm
550 euros
INQUIRE >

RELATED WORKS
ABOUT THE ARTIST

CATHERINE WILKENING

“One day in 2002, during my career as an actress, the need to put my hands in matter imposed itself on me; the earth became vital to me at once. I launched into sculpture with a primal, animal instinct, guided by a deep and irreproachable impulse. My exploration is underground and organic, my work is physical, sensual, enjoyable. There is no conceptual plan, I let go of what is in my head and become one with living matter. I take a leap into the void.

My work has always been nourished by the feminine figure, with obsessive themes – birth, chaos, death, rebirth, impermanence, devotion, cannibalism – subjects that I explored through porcelain sculptures in 2019 during Art Paris at the Grand Palais with Loo & Lou Gallery. Today, going through these long periods of confinement in an anxiety-provoking climate, I feel the need to connect to the luminous, the spiritual, the elevated, the transcendental… to work on repetition, the multiple, the swarming, the infinite, the infinitely monumental in the infinitely tiny, like mantras that soothe and numb cerebral agitation, like broad breaths – to build from chaos, from fragments of aborted or abandoned sculptures, and give them a new breath of life… These long months of gestation birthed immense, immaculate, porcelain Madonnas, adorned with gold, Murano glass, crowned with roses, thorns, roots.”

– Catherine Wilkening

FLO ARNOLD

Flo Arnold, Installation, papier hydrofuge sur laiton gainé, led, 600 x 340 cm, 2018 © Flo Arnold

FLO ARNOLD

Flo Arnold was born in France and grew up in Casablanca, Morocco. She currently lives and works between Morocco and France. She has had many solo shows in France and abroad, notably at the Marrakesh Biennial in Morocco in 2014 and in 2016, and at the Loo & Lou Gallery in Paris, France in 2018. She also presented with the Loo & Lou Foundation in 2018 the monumental installation Le secret des signes during “Nuit Blanche” at the Church of Saint Paul in Paris, France. Additionally, Arnold participated in several group shows, including ones at the Foundation Pierre Berger and the Institut du Monde Arabe in 2013, at the Musée de la Palmeraie in Marrakesh, Morocco, in 2014, and at the Institut Bernard Magrez, in Bordeaux, France, in 2017, among others.

The crossing of cultures is a key element in her work and has been forged by her many trips through Africa, Europe, and the United States. Her installations display an existential nomadism with artistic gestures that are born from her journeys. In 2016, she participated in the Biennale de Marrakech, where she exhibited her waterproof paper on coated brass installations for the first time at the Musée de la Palmeraie. 

Her creations are often backlit and sometimes supplemented with sound. She uses Japanese white paper to suggest ephemerality and fragility, but also a kind of evanescence emphasized by the appearance of levitation. Arnold’s sculptures indeed appear to be floating, and create a space for contemplation and spirituality. 

“My life is the story of earth and encounters, my identity ‘citizen of the world’. My childhood influenced my artistic research, always in motion, changing countries, houses, cultures. I’ve learned a lot from the people around me.”

In the Loo & Lou Atelier, she installed a piece in situ entitled Vertige du Monde. A germination of organic, backlit paper devoured the space as if it were overgrown vegetation, that was accompanied by a soundtrack. The interior space disappeared under a spotless “waterfall.” With this piece, she emphasized that in order to forget the dizziness of the world around us, we must live in a sphere without borders nor limitations in the search for our inner peace.

Collections/Prizes:

Room Mate Collection / First Prize – JustMad2019 / Arts Garden, City of Marrakesh/ Mamda Foundation, Rabat / Saadi Palace, Marrakesh / BMCE BANK, Marocco / Société Générale, Morocco / CNIA Insurance / San Francisco Food Bank / The Royal Palace, Morocco / Palmeraie Museum, Marrakesh

  • Vue de l’installation, Loo&Lou Gallery L’Atelier, ©Loo&Lou Gallery
  • Vue de l’installation, Loo&Lou Gallery L’Atelier, ©Loo&Lou Gallery
  • Vue de l’installation, Loo&Lou Gallery L’Atelier, ©Loo&Lou Gallery
  • Cartographie du Vide 1, technique mixte et acrylique sur plexiglas, 40,5 x 50 cm, 2018 © Flo Arnold
  • Cartographie du Vide 1, technique mixte et acrylique sur plexiglas, 40,5 x 50 cm, 2018 © Flo Arnol2
  • Vue de l’installation, Loo&Lou Gallery L’Atelier, ©Loo&Lou Gallery

EXHIBITIONS

2017
Exhibition, 6.4 Gallery, Marrakech, Morocco.
Macparis, group exhibition, Bastille Design Center, Paris, France
Un pas de côté, group exhibition, Église des Célestins, Avignon, France.
Never Give Up, group exhibition, Institut Bernard Magrez, Bordeaux, France.
Effleurage, group exhibition, space Souffle, Casablanca, Morocco.
2016
Les instants vidéo. État d’urgence poétique, Friche la belle de mai, Marseille, France.
No boundaries, 29 Gallery, Évian, France.
Biennale de Marrakech, Musée de la Palmeraie, Marrakech, Morocco.
Guest of honor, group exhibition, Fauv’Art, Ferney Voltaire, France.
Group exhibition, Arielle d’Hauterives Gallery, Bruxelles, Belgium.
2015
Songe de matières, exposition de sculptures, Espace Expressions CDG Gallery, Rabat, Morocco. 
2014
Biennale de Marrakech, Yahin & Boaz Gallery, Marrakech, Morocco.
Insoumission, Musée de la Palmeraie, 2ème forum international des droits de l’homme, Marrakech, Morocco.
Pop Up, Vogelsang Gallery, New York, United-States of America.
2013
Exhibition, Saint James Gallery, Bordeaux, France.
SYRIART, Fondation Pierre Berger, Institut du Monde Arabe, Paris, France.
2012
Noir sur Blanc Gallery, Marrakech, Morocco.
2011
Loft Art Gallery, Casablanca, Morocco.
Biennale de Marrakech, Marie Vitoux Gallery, Paris, France
2010
Biennale de Marrakech, Loft Gallery, Casablanca, Morocco.
2009
Exhibition, Loft Art Gallery, Casablanca, Morocco.

FLO ARNOLD

Vertige du Monde
Exhibition from 26.04.18 to 09.06.18
VIDEO : Footage of exhibition, Vertige du Monde

CHRISTOPHE MIRALLES

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Collision, huile sur toile, 146 x 114 cm, 2018, © Christophe Miralles

Christophe Miralles

Christophe Miralles is a Franco-Spanish artist who lives and works between Burgundy and Casablanca. He has received many prizes such as the Azart Prize in 2005. His work has been the subject of numerous monographic exhibitions in France and abroad, integrating various collections.

From his roots in Morocco, one can note the influences that resonate between the two shores of the Mediterranean, which never cease to collide with one another. Undoubtedly, Spanish painting from the Golden Age has sealed his relationship with light.

Human figures suspended in the air haunt his canvases, inducing feelings of worry mixed with a certain nostalgia. The combination of simplified forms and subtle nuances in colors allows him to give a timeless aspect to his paintings, where the material is the main subject.

Miralles creates oil and lacquer paintings on paper and canvas. He brought together a series of paintings for an exhibition at Loo & Lou gallery entitled Territoire Unique in April 2018. His work is based on themes of humanity, travel, and tolerance. Colors burn through his canvases, engorging them in flames, with the ashes slowly falling on his large, black papers. He is a painter anchored in contemporary society, a territory that he hopes is unique for each person.

EXHIBITIONS

2019
JustMAD (Fair), Madrid, Spain
2018
Tony Tollet Prize, Ecully, France
2017
Effleurage, Espace souffle, Casablanca, Morocco.
Group exhibition, Thema Gallery, Casablanca, Morocco.
2016
Exhibition, Marie Vitoux Gallery, Paris, France.
Exhibition, Bresson Gallery, Béziers, France.
Exhibition, Collection (1.0), Charnay, France.
Biennale de Marrakech, BAB, Marrakech, Morocco.
Prix Tony Tollet, group exhibition, Ecully, France.
Biennale de Cachan, Cachan, France.
Group exhibition, Contemporary art center, Serviès en Val, France.
Group exhibition, Dar El Kitab Gallery, Casablanca, Morocco.
Group exhibition, Soart Gallery, Casablanca, Morocco.
2015
Exhibition, Melting Art Gallery, Lille, France.
Art up, contemporary art  fair , Lille, France.
Group exhibition, Chantal Mélanson Gallery, Annecy, France.
Group exhibition, Dar El Kitab Gallery, Casablanca, Morocco.
Group exhibition, Egregore Gallery, Marmande, France.
BAB draw, Gueliz, Marrakech, Morocco.
Group exhibition, Crid’Art Gallery, Metz, France.
2014
Exhibition, Marie Vitoux Gallery, Paris, France.
Exhibition, Christine Colon Gallery, Liège, Belgium.
Exhibition with Flo Arnold, space Chapelle Saint Avoye, La Clayette, France.
Biennale de Marrakech, Yakin&Boaz Gallery, Marrakech, Morocco.
Insoumission, Musée de la Palmeraie, Marrakech, Marco.
Group exhibition, Danielle Bourdette Gallery, Honfleur, France.
Group exhibition, Martine Ehmer Gallery, Bruxelles, Belgium.
Group exhibition, Dar El Kitab Gallery, Casablanca, Morocco.
Biennale de Marrakech with the Yakin&Boaz Gallery, Marrakech, Morocco.
Genèse, group exhibition, Fondation Taylor, Association Rémanence, Paris, France.
2013
Les Arts en balade, guest of honor, Chapelle de l’Hôpital, Clermont Ferrand, France.
Exhibition, St James, Bordeaux Gallery, France.
Palindrome, exhibition with Florence Arnold, Yakin&Boaz Gallery, Casablanca, Morocco.
2012
Exhibition, Marie Vitoux Gallery, Paris, France.
Exhibition, Didier Bresson Gallery, Béziers, France.
Exhibition, Danielle Bourdette Gallery, Honfleur, France.
Exhibition, Le Soleil sur la plage Gallery, Lyon, France.
Exhibition, Le Clos des Cimaises Gallery, St Georges du Bois, France.

PAUL DE PIGNOL

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Paul de Pignol

Paul de Pignol was born in Toulouse in 1965. He currently lives and works between Paris and Montigny-sur-Loing.

In 1984, he entered the National School of Fine Arts in Paris, where he worked in Pierre Carron’s painting studio. He created his first sculpture, inspired by the Venus of Lucas Cranach, entitled “Fille au Ballon” in 1989. Little by little, sculpting was integrated into his practice.

In 2010, de Pignol decided to dedicate a specific workshop to drawing in Paris, establishing a link between the two disciplines a short time afterwards. Whether sculpting or drawing, de Pignol plunges into an intimate essence of the being. He focuses his work on feminine figures, linking them with universal themes of birth, life, and death. Throughout his study of the female figure, he began questioning its function, weight, and composition, as well as its deconstruction and presence both of the interior and exterior.

De Pignol’s paintings are an extension of his work and research as a sculptor. His gestures are similar, wherein he erases matter in order to add light, stroke by stroke, giving his unravelling bodies a spectral presence.

Since 2017, after years of failure, rejection, and wandering, de Pignol found pictorial language relative to his research. One of his recent exhibitions at Loo & Lou Gallery, Né du limon, is the result of this quest. With a fascination for landscapes, the artist is inspired by the Fontainebleau forest that surrounds his studio. The idea that any life can be birthed from decay fascinates him, and inspires him to create organic and living landscapes, where you can feel the turf and soil. We are close to Golem. This exhibition reunited for the first time drawings, sculptures, and canvases, in what represented for the artist a joyous and fertile renewal, thanks to both the subject matter and the use of multiple medias.

OLIVIER DE SAGAZAN

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Untitled 6, 2022, Acrylic, grass, clay, and mixed media on canvas, 160 x 130 cm © Olivier de Sagazan

OLIVIER DE SAGAZAN

“For those unfamiliar with Olivier de Sagazan’s work, it can appear rather morbid and provocative at first glance. He sees his creations as a way to shake up our conscience and to underline the exceptional character of life.

For our first collaboration with the artist in 2016, we hosted his performance “Transfiguration” as a preamble to his exhibition. It consisted of a one man show, in which a man in a suit arrived on stage and gradually entered into a form of trance to disfigure himself, sometimes vociferating, and used clay and paint to cover his face and body.

This confrontation produced a certain effect on the public. After the performance, I still remember seeing some quasi-bloodless faces amongst our guests. A friend that I met in the crowd also seemed a bit shaken. He was not yet a collector of Sagazan’s works (he would become one later on!), and his stance was rather reserved, not really knowing the nature of the feelings that ran through him. He really had to take the time to digest it, he told me…

As for me, at times I could not escape a sort of amazement from this character, the artist who had suddenly become unknown to me, transforming himself before our eyes. I had a confused feeling, without knowing precisely that something primordial had been elevated from this experience.

And yet, this was not unknown territory. During the preparation of the exhibition, we visited his “workshop-capharnaüm” in Saint Nazaire and discovered a plethora of creations which evoked a strange universe to me. Sculptures, paintings of bodies, and creatures shaped from the earth—a form of reinvented bestiary—were all over the studio…

The first feeling that came to me when my gaze landed on these disemboweled, bruised, flayed bodies, inevitably referred to a mortiferous feeling. Although, something else came to the fore almost immediately: a more poetic reading. Yes, they were damaged bodies, but they were also faces devoid of pain or sadness. His creatures seemed to freeze for eternity. Sagazan’s world was not so disturbing, and the slightly macabre impression from before was largely overcome.

As his next exhibition, Etre Chair, will confirm, after uprooting there is rooting, or at least an attempt to do so. The artist proposes a dialogue between his sculptures and a series of landscapes undertaken during Covid, a time when he felt the need to connect with nature even more strongly. The majority of his landscapes exclude the bodies that he used to include. With the notable exception, however, of a painting representing an undergrowth in which we see, connected, by the roots, a buried body that emerges on the surface.”

– by Bruno Blosse, artistic director of Loo&Lou Gallery, Paris

 

Born in 1959 at Brazzaville in Congo, Olivier de Sagazan lives and works in Saint-Nazaire.

Trained as a biologist, he is interested in the living and, through his pieces, seeks to establish a sort of genealogy of the sensibility. He aims to better understand how, at some point, inert material structured by cells engenders life and sensitivity.

For about 25 years, Olivier de Sagazan’s work has principally revolved around the human body. In parallel with his creations – paintings, sculptures, installations – de Sagazan produces performances, popularly seen by the entire world, during which he utilizes his own body as a mold, with clay and paint as his mediums. Converting his face and body, he manoeuvers through choreographed gestures, alloting for radical metamorphoses.

The artist predominantly uses clay and plants that he gathers and kneads in order to create lifelike material. From these elements, a polymorphic world appears composed of different characters like a bestiary where humans intertwine with animals.

EXHIBITIONS

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

JOHAN VAN MULLEM

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JOHAN VAN MULLEM

 

Johan Van Mullem was born in Congo in 1959 to Belgian parents. He grew up moving around the world as a result of his parents various diplomatic postings, including a seven year stay in Tunisia. The artist has always been an autodidact. He started drawing at the age of five and  never stopped, following in his father and grandfather’s footsteps. His family roots are in the city of Bruge, and from which he went on to study architecture in Brussels. Later on, Johan began exploring with etching and painting. Today he paints with etching ink, and is considered to be one of the only artists who uses this medium as a way to create paintings.
 
Since his youth, Van Mullem has persisted in his search for wrinkled faces, seeking the beauty that he recognized in the experience that is “engraved” on faces and in hands. Since then, the face remains the major subject of his work. The subjects appear  rejuvenated, disappearing or emerging in a halo of light in an old-fashioned sfumato, offering an escape into a world of emotion. His work is an invitation to look inward and go on a journey of omnipresent emotional charge of which one  cannot part ways indifferently, an effect of the bewildering depth of his paintings.
 
The superimposition and erasure of many smooth layers of diluted inks further accentuates the feeling of viewing a presence on the canvas that is difficult to describe. Van Mullem has mastered this specific and unique technique through self-learning, executing his pieces in etching ink as an extension of his experience as an engraver, giving his work an additional, exceptional character.
 
A multifaceted artist, designer, poet, musician, painter and sculptor, Van Mullem strives to create a diverse but absolutely coherent œuvre that builds bridges to link and awaken our senses. Though his pieces are contemporary, they can suggest references to historical masterpieces.
 
His paintings are in major private collections and Museum collections throughout Europe. He has held solo exhibitions in Art Galleries located in London, Paris, New York and Brussels. His work was exhibited in various European Museums.
AVAILABLE WORKS

NELSON MAKAMO, Connaissance des Arts, July 2019

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NELSON MAKAMO, Beaux Arts Magazine, July 2019

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NELSON MAKAMO, Figaro Scope, July 2019

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